Minds On

Where did they go?

Suppose your teacher wants you to guess what they did over the weekend. Use the clues from the following image to make a guess!

A bag with 5 items inside; a towel, plastic water bottle, wide-brimmed sun hat, sunscreen, and black sunglasses.

What did your teacher do over the weekend? How do you know? Record your thinking using a method of your choice. If possible, discuss with a partner.

Action

Task 1: Making an inference

What is an inference?

Making an inference involves reading between and beyond the lines. Readers who make inferences use clues from the text and what they know to draw a conclusion.

Why do we make them? We make inferences because it helps us to form a deeper understanding of the text. We can do things like figure out something that the author doesn’t actually say!

How to make an inference

Inference = clues from the text + background knowledge (schema).

To make an inference, you will use a) clues and information from the text and b) what you already know.

Here are examples of sentence starters for inferences:

  • I can infer… because…
  • The author doesn’t say this, but I think… because…
  • I have come to the conclusion that… because…
  • This makes me think… because…

The following checklist consists of success criteria for making an inference.

I will make an inference that…

Make at least one inference about each scenario. Record your ideas in the following fillable and printable Inferences Chart or in another method of your choice.

Inferences Chart
Scenario Consider My Inference
It was the first day of spring, and Diego was excited to start planting all the beautiful flowers he had purchased. What can you infer about Diego’s job?
I heard a loud “thwack” as the ball left the ballpark and the crowd roared with cheers! What can you infer about the setting?
She put on her winter clothing on, grabbed her shovel and made her way outside. What can you infer about the weather?
Sonny always carried his flute with him. What can you infer about this statement?

Press the ‘Activity’ button to access the Inferences Chart. 

Task 2: Scenario cards

Come up with an inference for each scenario card. Record your inferences in the following fillable and printable version of the Inference Task Cards or in another method of your choice.

Inference Task Cards
What can you infer about the cat?

Whether the first ray of sunlight is on the floor or by a window, my cat is usually right there soaking it all up.

My inference:

What can you infer happened overnight?

When I walked out of my house in the morning, the garbage can was tipped over and there was garbage all over the floor!

My inference:

Where can you infer the characters are going?

We bought tickets and some popcorn.

My inference:

What can you infer about the setting?

Marlon put on his raincoat and grabbed his umbrella as he walked out the door.

My inference:

What can you infer about what the character likes to do?

Darla added another book to her wish list at the library. She had a collection of audio books and hard cover books that she could not wait to explore.

My inference:

What can you infer happened before?

The class applauded while Hassan took his seat.

My inference:

What can you infer about the character’s feelings?

Sanjay jumped up and down, clapping his hands. His best friend just scored the winning goal!

My inference:

What can you infer about Raphael?

When Raphael gets home from school every day, the first thing he does is play his piano.

My inference:

Press the ‘Activity’ button to access the Inference Task Cards. 

Refer to the following checklist to help you make your inferences.

Success criteria for making an inference:

Consolidation

Task 1: Making your own inferences

Make at least three inferences about a story that you are currently reading or have recently read.

Record your ideas in the following fillable and printable Making Inferences graphic organizer or in a method of your choice. For example, you can type, write, use speech to text, or create an audio recording.

Making Inferences
Clues from text + What I know = My Inference

Making Inferences Press the ‘Activity’ button to access the Making Inferences. Activity (Open PDF in a new window)

Task 2: Let’s reflect

Use the following questions to reflect on your learning:

  • How does making inferences help you as a reader?
  • Why do we need to combine what we know and textual information to make an inference?

Record your responses using a method of your choice.

Reflection

As you read through these descriptions, which sentence best describes how you are feeling about your understanding of this learning activity? Press the button that is beside this sentence.

I feel…

Now, record your ideas using a voice recorder, speech-to-text, or writing tool.

Riddle me this…

Practice making inferences through a riddle.

Create a riddle and challenge a partner to solve it. Be sure to provide them with a number of clues. Can they solve it? Ask them to explain their thinking.

Record your riddle using a method of your choice. You can type, write, use speech-to-text, or record an audio clip.